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Answers from the BJC Experts

Ask the BJC Expert allows you to get the answers you need about a variety of health, medicine and exercise issues to help you live a more healthy life.

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What are good fats and bad fats?

The good fats include both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. These types of fats work in the body to help decrease bad cholesterol, low-density level lipoproteins (LDL); and increase high-density level lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Polyunsaturated fat is a good fat, but monounsaturated fat is better for the body. Polyunsaturated fats include: soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, cottonseed oil, walnuts and fish oil. Monounsaturated fats include canola oil, olive oil, peanut oil, nuts and avocados.

The bad fats include both saturated fat and trans fatty acids. These fats raise cholesterol levels. They are solid at room temperature. Trans fatty acids are hydrogenated or processed, which makes them unhealthy. Saturated fats include butter, coconut and palm oils, chocolate, meat fats, poultry skin, whole and 2% milk, cheese and hard shortening. Trans fatty acids include stick margarine, hard shortening, commercially fried foods, i.e., french fries, baked goods and high-fat snacks.

What are good fats and bad fats?

The good fats include both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats. These types of fats work in the body to help decrease bad cholesterol, low-density level lipoproteins (LDL); and increase high-density level lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Polyunsaturated fat is a good fat, but monounsaturated fat is better for the body. Polyunsaturated fats include: soybean oil, corn oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, cottonseed oil, walnuts and fish oil. Monounsaturated fats include canola oil, olive oil, peanut oil, nuts and avocados.

The bad fats include both saturated fat and trans fatty acids. These fats raise cholesterol levels. They are solid at room temperature. Trans fatty acids are hydrogenated or processed, which makes them unhealthy. Saturated fats include butter, coconut and palm oils, chocolate, meat fats, poultry skin, whole and 2% milk, cheese and hard shortening. Trans fatty acids include stick margarine, hard shortening, commercially fried foods, i.e., french fries, baked goods and high-fat snacks.

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