Children’s Hospital is on the ‘Frontline’ for Emmys

“The Frontline for Hope,” a six-part documentary-style series shot at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, won two regional Emmy awards, including an Emmy for Current Affairs Program Special.

The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) presented the 37th Mid-America Emmy awards at the Renaissance Grand Hotel downtown Oct. 5.

The second “The Frontline for Hope” award recognized excellence in video editing. St. Louis-based Coolfire Originals and Coolfire Media, which shot and produced the docu-series, won a total of five awards at the gala, including the two for “The Frontline for Hope.”

“The Frontline for Hope” aired on six consecutive Saturday nights in March-April 2013 on KSDK-TV. The show followed dozens of SLCH patients, their families, their medical teams and SLCH staff for a close-up look at life inside the hospital.

The winning entry, episode 3, titled “Trauma One,” featured a teenager named Isabella who was injured in an automobile accident. The show follows Isabella’s recovery from broken bones and a head injury, as well as a surprise intra-operative diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Isabella’s medical team featured on the show included Brad Warner, MD; Jeff Leonard, MD; and pediatric trauma nurse MaryAlice McCubbins, RN, CPNP-PC, APN.

Madison, a cystic fibrosis patient awaiting a lung transplant, and Dave, an infant in the CICU with a rare and complex series of medical issues, were both featured throughout the series, including episode 3. All six episodes, plus bonus materials, are available at http://www.childrensforhope.com/episodes/episode-3/.

The Mid-America Emmys recognize excellence in broadcasting in television markets in Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Illinois, Arkansas and Louisiana.

SLCH also received Emmy attention beyond “The Frontline for Hope.” KSDK anchor Mike Bush won an Emmy in Health and Science News for his feature story about Joe and Cecelia Detwiler and their miraculous recovery at SLCH from critical injuries following an automobile accident two years ago.

Two other SLCH stories were nominated for Emmys, but did not win. KTVI-TV anchor Mandy Murphey was nominated in Health and Science News for her story about a Fetal Care Center patient born with an omphalocele, and KTVI-TV reporter Paul Schankman was nominated in the category of Arts and Entertainment for his story highlighting a cleft palate patient with a starring role in The Muny’s presentation of “The King and I.”